National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Presentation – Rights & Resources for Victims of Crime in Middlesex County – Presented in English and Spanish – April 21, 7:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. – Free to attend on Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89437471896?pwd=WldvUFBCa0l6cWs4SXdYZU5DMkh0UT09

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The Women Behind Women Aware – Meet Cindy

Cindy is a Creative Arts Therapist. She draws inspiration from Friedl Dicker Brandeis, an artist sent to Terezin, a Nazi propaganda camp, in 1942. Brandeis held secret art classes for the children so they could express themselves. Brandeis and 500 of the children she taught were killed, but their hidden artwork survived. Before she was sent to the camp, Brandeis was a mentor and teacher of Edith Kramer, who is credited with being a founder of Art Therapy. Cindy was fortunate to travel to Terezin and witness the artwork of the children.

Cindy is a passionate advocate for people who live with the repercussions of traumatic brain injury as this issue has affected her family. She strives to be a witness to people’s struggles, letting them know they are seen, heard, and important: she sees the arts as a natural and instinctual way to do this.

As Cindy continues to travel, her favorite place in the world changes: right now, it is Hawaii with its rainforests, volcano hikes, beaches and snorkeling. She is currently reading a fun book, Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette?, the story of a woman who reconnects with herself and her passions. If she could, Cindy would trade places for a day with the curator of her favorite museum, The Isabella Gardner Museum in Boston. Her secret talent is playing the guitar and Cindy only recently began playing for friends and in public.

When asked about a case that has special meaning for her, Cindy shared, “There was a young client who shared their feelings with me through characters that they drew. Through these drawings they shared hard times and strengths. As trust grew, the client would also share feelings as themselves in a direct way. It was an honor and a privilege to be trusted to witness the client’s true feelings without the container of the drawing.”